Mission Market & Fair

For many years, GPC has hosted a market every November/December to kick off the holiday season and provide an opportunity to purchase with a purpose. In the last few years, we’ve updated the name to reflect the fact that mission has expanded significantly, and that there are increasingly ways that GPC serves year round. Our hope is that you’ll come by not only to purchase olive oil from Palestine or nativity sets from Niger, but that you’ll take a few moments to be proud of all the ways GPC gives, and even sign up to try something new.

Thank you for continuing to serve as we grow together in love and faith!

Peace,
Chris

The Silver Lining in Politics

On Tuesday night, like many Americans, I watched some of the coverage of the election returns, with a combination of despair at how divisive the dialog around our differences is, and hope that we might find a path to conversation and greater unity. I’ve always believed that all humans, even coming from drastically different cultural, political, religious and economic places, have much more in common than not. But sadly, we prove easily distracted from that fact by leaders who choose the shortcut to power found in dividing us from each other.

Searching for my rose colored glasses, perhaps you’re not surprised that I keep coming back to music. I admire the composers of the past who continued to practice their art through the wars, political and theological divisions that fractured people and countries. There was beauty to be made, the mystery of God to express. Music, with its many independent yet harmonious voices, models for how we too could get along, work together, collaborate to form a cohesive whole. At GPC every week, we have the unique privilege to do just that, to cut through the chaotic noise of division with the even more powerful music of unity.

Peace,
Mark

A History of Stewardship

We have been working our way through the book of Acts and reading lately about Paul’s adventures. One of the things Paul does on his travels is to take up offerings and collections of money to support the growing church and the ministry to the poor. Some things never change! It is stewardship season and like Paul — we are looking for pledges of support for 2019.

One of the reasons Paul raised money was to get the new converts to be a part of Christ’s ongoing ministry in the world. With our collections and pledges, together we are able to support a growing and vibrant ministry at Georgetown Presbyterian Church. We rely on our generous and committed members who make our work possible.

Thank you for supporting our church, believing in its mission, and keeping the faith from one generation to the next. To God be the Glory!

With sincere gratitude for your gifts to GPC,

CCM

A Pastoral Note around the Pittsburgh Synagogue Shooting

Grace and Peace,

This past Saturday, during Shabbat services at the Or L’Simcha Synagogue in Pittsburgh, eleven people were murdered by a man fueled by anti-Semitic hatred, the kind that has terrorized our Jewish sisters and brothers for millennia. Our first response is to grieve, and so we mourn with the Jewish community the loss of precious lives cut short as they grapple with this act of hate.

As we have been reading through the books of Acts, you perhaps have noticed that the theme of conflict between the Jewish and Gentile communities figures prominently in the story of the early church. These and other New Testament Scriptures have been used by Christians to fuel anti-Semitism through false interpretations, seeking to divide Jews from Christians using the person of Jesus, the Jewish rabbi who we call the Messiah.

Although we ourselves may not have promoted anti-Jewish theologies, we nonetheless confess, before God and our Jewish sisters and brothers, the ways in which the Christian church has promoted hate through fear, false narratives, and poor interpretation. Although it may not be our fault, it is our responsibility to set the record straight in proclaiming that the God of Jesus Christ, who we worship, is also the God of Israel, and that our hope is in the reconciliation, not the division, of all peoples.

Simply put, this vision of reconciliation is woven into the fabric of scripture. It begins with the “tree of life in the middle of the garden,” (Gen 2:9) and culminates in the “the tree of life with… the leaves of the tree [that are] for the healing of the nations.” (Rev 22)

Don’t be afraid to reach out to a Jewish friend, co-worker, or neighbor, and let them know that you care, and that you reject the hateful ideology that has led to this past week’s tragedy. As we continue our journey through Acts we must interpret scripture through the greatest commandment: To love God and love neighbor. There can be no valid Christian interpretation outside of this. This congregation seeks to provide these interpretive tools through worship, education, and in conversation with pastors and one another.

Peace,
Pastors Camille, Rachel, and Chris

A Pastoral Note After the Pittsburgh Synagogue Shooting

This past Saturday, during Shabbat services at the Or L’Simcha Synagogue in Pittsburgh, eleven people were murdered by a man fueled by anti-Semitic hatred, the kind that has terrorized our Jewish sisters and brothers for millennia. Our first response is to grieve, and so we mourn with the Jewish community the loss of precious lives cut short as they grapple with this act of hate.

As we have been reading through the books of Acts, you perhaps have noticed that the theme of conflict between the Jewish and Gentile communities figures prominently in the story of the early church. These and other New Testament Scriptures have been used by Christians to fuel anti-Semitism through false interpretations, seeking to divide Jews from Christians using the person of Jesus, the Jewish rabbi who we call the Messiah.

Although we ourselves may not have promoted anti-Jewish theologies, we nonetheless confess, before God and our Jewish sisters and brothers, the ways in which the Christian church has promoted hate through fear, false narratives, and poor interpretation. Although it may not be our fault, it is our responsibility to set the record straight in proclaiming that the God of Jesus Christ, who we worship, is also the God of Israel, and that our hope is in the reconciliation, not the division, of all peoples.

Simply put, this vision of reconciliation is woven into the fabric of scripture. It begins with the “tree of life in the middle of the garden,” (Gen 2:9) and culminates in the “the tree of life with… the leaves of the tree [that are] for the healing of the nations.” (Rev 22)

Don’t be afraid to reach out to a Jewish friend, co-worker, or neighbor, and let them know that you care, and that you reject the hateful ideology that has led to this past week’s tragedy. As we continue our journey through Acts we must interpret scripture through the greatest commandment: To love God and love neighbor. There can be no valid Christian interpretation outside of this. This congregation seeks to provide these interpretive tools through worship, education, and in conversation with pastors and one another.

Peace,
Pastors Camille, Rachel, and Chris